Have you seen a live, wounded or dead turtle? Swipe the slider or use the arrows!

Carapace Project Turtle Sighting Form


  • LOCATION: Please select only one of the following four options. Please do not alter the data autogenerated by the form after you have filled in the location.

  • Please read the following if you have found a wounded turtle.
  • Drop files here or

Have you seen a turtle in Quebec? The Carapace Project wants to know about it!


It’s not unusual to see turtles leave the relative safety of wetlands to travel on land. During their active season, from May to October, turtles are on the move to search for food, find a new habitat, look for a mate, or lay eggs. Unfortunately, traveling on land and crossing roads has its share of risk for turtles because it makes them vulnerable to collisions or disturbance.

This is why the Carapace team needs your help. If you spot a turtle in Quebec, let us know by filling out the form on this website.

Be on the lookout especially in June! Female turtles travel more frequently to find a good spot to lay their eggs. You might see them digging on road shoulders made of sand or gravel, a behavior that often costs them their lives.

Turtles of Quebec


  • Snapping turtle

    Photo: NCC

  • Painted turtle

    Photo: NCC

  • Musk turtle

    Photo: NCC

  • Blanding’s turtle

    Photo: Simon Pelletier

  • Map turtle

    Photo: Simon Pelletier

  • Wood turtle

    Photo: Frédérick Lelièvre

  • Spiny Softshell turtle

    Photo: Lyne Bouthillier

  • Spotted turtle

    Photo: Daniel Brunton


Before helping a turtle at risk of being struck by vehicles


  • Consider your own safety first! Consult our road safety measures.
  • Reduce your speed and make every effort to avoid it if it’s on the roadside shoulder.
  • Notify other drivers of its presence to help them avoid it.
  • Observe it from afar so as to not frighten it, and wait for it to finish crossing the road.
  • In case of immediate danger, help the turtle cross the road in the direction in which it is already headed.
  • If you need to pick it up, never hold it by its tail! Instead grab the shell near the back with both hands while staying close to the ground, or push the turtle very gently across the road with an object.
  • Do not move it to a different spot!
  • Do not put it back in the water!
  • Be careful; it can bite.
  • For an emergency concerning the survival of an injured turtle, contact an expert in your area.

To learn more about the different turtle species in Quebec

We invite you to check out the Atlas des amphibiens et reptiles du Québec’s website.

CONSULT THE ATLAS (FRENCH ONLY)

Contact us

Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you have questions or concerns! The Carapace Project team can be reached by e-mail at carapace@natureconservancy.ca.

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)


Turtles may take up to 25 years before reproducing, and their egg survival rate is very low (approximately 2 eggs out of 100 become adult turtles). To maintain their numbers within a population, turtles therefore count on the survival of the adults, especially the females.

However, human activities in the habitat brings many threats and increases adult mortality rates, which can have serious consequences on a population. For example, scientists have determined that an increase of more than 5 % in annual mortality for the Wood and Blanding’s turtles could lead to the decline of a population.

Every effort counts to protect our turtle populations!

All species are important within an ecosystem. Turtles have a role both as predator and a prey. They help clean up ponds or lakes by eating plants, insects, and dead fish while representing a food source for other animals. They also help to disperse other life forms by travelling from wetlands to wetlands. Removing any species from its ecosystem can drastically affect the balance by altering other organisms. As humans, we don’t necessarily see the impact of each species on our well-being, though a slight change may have a trickle effect which can eventually have consequences on our lives.

Think of it as an airplane from which you remove nuts and bolts here and there. At one point don’t you think the place would crash?

Turtles are vulnerable to traffic during their active season, from May to October. Female turtles are especially at risk of a collision in June because they travel more frequently to find a good spot to lay their eggs.
Turtles know where they are going. By moving a turtle to a different site not only it can be an unsuitable habitat but you compromise its survival by making it travel a longer distance to come back to where it was initially going. You are also increasing the risk or propagating diseases to other species. Before touching a turtle refer to the section “Before helping a turtle at risk of being struck by vehicles”.
Refer to the section “Before helping a turtle at risk of being struck by vehicles”.

Never disturb, touch or move a turtle or its eggs! If you want to protect a nest from predators on your property, contact a resource person in your region.

It’s not unusual to discover egg shells from a nest that has been predated by raccoons or skunks. Predation is a part of the life cycle and biology of the turtles.

Sand and gravel are ideal substrate for turtles to lay their eggs. Sometimes they can’t find a suitable habitat in nature because of habitat destruction so they use what they can find, and gravel shoulders are common in rural areas.
If a turtle is injured after being hit by a car:

  • Do not rinse it or put it in water.
  • Do not feed it.
  • Do not turn it on its back, this might injure it further!
  • Place the turtle in a well ventilated container in a cool dark place, away from predators, insects, and sun.
  • Contact an expert that can assess the situation and guide you.
  • Report your observation on our sighting form. We document injured turtles occurrences.

If you are unable to quickly contact an expert, try to keep the turtle hydrated by offering a bowl of water or by trickling water in front of its beak.

Note: Under Quebec’s Act Respecting the Conservation and Development of Wildlife, in order to rehabilitate any wildlife species, the individual must be a veterinarian or possess a licence for a wildlife rehabilitation centre, a zoological garden, or a wildlife observation centre. These individuals must take all possible steps to avoid domestication and release the animal in nature if it is able to survive.

Report your observation on our Carapace sighting form. We document turtle mortality.
The photo allows us to confirm the turtle species and thus better document the road mortality threat for each species. Accurate data will also help select priority actions in an area since some species are more threatened than others.

Nowadays, smartphones and digital devices are part of the daily lives of most people, so we have chosen to make that very important piece of information mandatory.

If you have noted the exact location of the turtle but are unable to stop safely to take a picture, contact us to find out how you can report your observation.

The photo allows us to confirm the turtle species and thus better document the road mortality threat for each species. Accurate data will also help select priority actions in an area since some species are more threatened than others.

Nowadays, smartphones and digital devices are part of the daily lives of most people, so we have chosen to make that very important piece of information mandatory.

If you have noted the exact location of the turtle but are unable to stop safely to take a picture, contact us to find out how you can report your observation.

The Carapace project is managed by two Gatineau-based turtle enthusiasts as part of their various activities with the Nature Conservancy of Canada.
The information received in the sighting forms is autogenerated in a database that is shared annually with experts from the Quebec Turtle Recovery Team and partners who can undertake actions to protect turtles.
Excellent French tools exist to clearly identify the different species of turtles in Quebec, including the Atlas des amphibiens et reptiles du Québec and the guide “Amphibiens et reptiles du Québec et des Maritimes” (Desroches et Rodrigue), available in bookstores.

For English tools, we invite you to browse the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre website.

Do not hesitate to raise awareness about Carapace by sharing it on social networks. The success of this platform depends on users who know about it and use it. You can also make a donation to help manage the platform and protect turtles.
Carapace is continually and actively looking for people who can take care of injured turtles. If you have the expertise, resources and legal authorizations to work with wildlife species, please contact us.

Experts for injured turtles


Refuge Pageau
4241, chemin Croteau
Amos (Québec) J9T 3A1
refuge@refugepageau.ca
819-732-8999
Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Bas-Saint-Laurent

Geneviève Bourget
genevieve.bourget@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
418-862-8213 ext. 302

Mathieu Bélanger
mathieu.belanger@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
418-862-8213 ext. 301

Formation Jacinthe Bouchard
4055, rang des Soixantes
Nicolet (Québec) J3T 1P5
819-293-5170
Miller Zoo
20, route Hurley
Frampton (Québec) G0R 1M0
418-209-8776

SOS Miss Dolittle
418-561-2484
contact@missdolittle.com

Zoo de Granby
Patrick Paré
ppare@zoodegranby.com

Le refuge de Buzz
971 rue Galt Est
Sherbrooke (Québec)
819-566-4803
Note: Can handle Red-eared slider turtles.

Bioparc de la Gaspésie
Stéphanie Bentz, biologist
sbentz@bioparc.ca
418-534-1997 ext. 102

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Montréal
Lyne Bouthilier and Nathalie Tessier
450-928-7608

Magazoo
1951 Bélanger est
Montréal (Québec)
H2G 1B8

514-593-5538
info@magazoo.com

Repti-Zone
514 -475-3160
repti-zone@hotmail.com
Mr. Robert A. Poirier
819-449-2164

If an intervention is required in person, please be expected to travel to meet the volunteer because he is not able to do so.

Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre
See list of wildlife rehabilitation centres here.

Contacts for information


Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Bas-Saint-Laurent

Geneviève Bourget
genevieve.bourget@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
418-862-8213 ext. 302

Mathieu Bélanger
mathieu.belanger@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
418-862-8213 ext. 301

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Montagnes frontalières
Patrice Laliberté
patrice.laliberte@conservationdelanature.ca
Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Montréal
514-873-2140

Grands parcs et parcs-nature de la Ville de Montréal – Service des grands parcs, du verdissement et du Mont-Royal
Denis Fournier
denisfournier@ville.montreal.qc.ca
514-280-6697

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Gaspésie & Îles-de-la-Madeleine
Mathieu Morin
mathieu.morin@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Lanaudière
Chantal Côté
chantal.cote@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
450-654-7786 ext. 260

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Laurentides & Lanaudière
Annie Ferland
annie.ferland@conservationdelanature.ca

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Laurentides
Sébastien Auger
sebastien.auger@mffp.gouv.qc.ca
819-623-5781 poste 261

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Laurentides & Lanaudière
Annie Ferland
annie.ferland@conservationdelanature.ca

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Lac Champlain, Haut-Saint-Laurent
Julien Poisson
julien.poisson@conservationdelanature.ca

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Estrie
Marie-Josée Goulet
819-820-3883 poste 230

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs – Montérégie
Lyne Bouthilier
450-928-7608 poste 311
Nathalie Tessier
450-928-7608 poste 310

Nature-Action Québec – Corridor vert de Vaudreuil-Soulanges
Geneviève Gervais
corridorvert@nature-action.qc.ca
450-536-0422 ext. 422

Zoo de Granby – Lac Champlain, Cantons de l’Est
Patrick Paré
ppare@zoodegranby.com

Corridor appalachien – MRC Haute-Yamaska, Brome-Missisquoi, Memphrémagog
Clément Robidoux
tortue@corridorappalachien.ca
450-297-1145

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Outaouais
Caroline Gagné and Milaine Saumur
carapace@conservationdelanature.ca

Bénévole – Biologiste expert
Daniel Toussaint
danieltoussaint@videotron.ca

Thank you to our financial partners!

Fondation de la faune du Québec
Department of Forests, Wildlife and Parks

With the help of

Parc de la Rivière-des-Milles-Îles

Thank you to our outreach partners!

Cobali - Comité du bassin versant de la rivière du Lièvre
Appalachian Corridor
Écolead Communication
Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada - Section Québec
Granby Zoo

Memphrémagog Conservation
Organisme de bassin versant de la baie Missisquoi
Solution Nature

Solution Nature

Île St-Bernard

Île St-Bernard


Domaine Tavibois
 
 
Centre Refuge Nymous